Nissan Road Racing Forums

Go Back   Nissan Road Racing Forums > Universal Discussion > Introduction/Builds

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old 08-15-2016, 04:28 AM
Logic Logic is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Finland
Posts: 41
Default

Having multiple small meters mounted into dash and a-pillar was never my taste. I liked the r34 gtr solution. What seems like a thousand years a go when my car was still at the road. I had small mini pc with windows and 7" touch screen mounted on center console. I was running hestec standalone ecu. Hestec software showed engine parameters.




Later updated ecu to new model. It has new software that could not be used as infosystem. Ecu has CAN output so I was looking to get race tech Dash2 and replace original instrument cluster. Base price isnt too bad but with all the extras I think it was close to 2000€.

This was the situation couple years a go. Since then Iīve been more active with microcontrollers and gotten more familiar with programming.

2016 spring I was able to create my own program that reads and writes microcontroller. This happens with serial data transfer via USB. As it happens my ECU also talks to itīs tuning software with serial. Got in touch to my ECU manufacturer and they gave me the serial protocol to read my ECU.

Here is the plan.


After getting in touch with recent computer tech decided to go with windows pad instead of separate computer. Bought cheap china pad with 10" screen. Possibly will be also replacing instument cluster with another pad. Something in Lexus LFA direction.




Screencap. Little out of date(erros and missaligments). Im not sure yet what will be the final outcome. Just the infoscreen with datalog or perhaps complete GUI which I could controll cars features. Iīll focus more on this next winter.


Here is short demo.


Last edited by Logic; 03-26-2017 at 09:30 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 08-17-2016, 08:33 AM
theultimatehero theultimatehero is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 103
Default

I'm really interested in the idea of running a tablet in the dash. They are so cheap these days and just as capable in most cases as a laptop. If you can run tuning software on it and display information, you would be streamlining the whole thing. You have some really cool stuff in this car, excited to see more!
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 08-17-2016, 12:14 PM
Logic Logic is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Finland
Posts: 41
Default

I got this myself. http://www.gearbest.com/tablet-pcs/pp_244794.html?wid=3

quad core cpu, 4gb ram, 10" 1920 x 1200 screen(should be the same screen as in windows surface pads) I do have some reservation it being china item but time will tell. So far few weeks using no problem. Has plenty power to run simple programs as tuning software and info display.
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 02-13-2017, 02:55 AM
Logic Logic is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Finland
Posts: 41
Default

I did wiring for the car couple years ago. Never did post about it. Was not satisfied about the end result and also there were still some unresolved issues.

Anyway. Couple years ago I was at the point I needed to get the car in running condition and wiring needed to be done. Money was tight so everything needed to be cheap or better free.

Started working on with the schematic. Thereīs a lot of stuff that need to be considered when wiring a street car. Specially one that has so much electrics as mine.


Decided to go with floating ground which is not an uncommon thing among racing cars. The idea is to provide return path for current via copper instead chassy. All the wiring will be routed on the passenger side.

For those interested about floating ground hereīs some reading.
http://www.innovatemotorsports.com/r...-grounding.php

I decided to do one mainboard beneath passenger footwell under fake floor. Mounted everything on plexi. Was planning redo to carbon panel when I could afford it. Also should have routed the wires through holes under the panel. The way I did it made it too tight and the wires are on the way of relays. Used 0,75mm2 wiring for everything since I had that available. Connectors were cheap multipin. They are crap but have the current rating needed. Wanted to go with circular mil spec type but they were too expensive.



Engine harness. Very light. Used generic insulated automotive connectors.


For controlling engine water pump, intercooler waterpump, gearbox and rear diff coolers. Got some ssd relays. I was planning running these with arduino. They are bit costly, big and heavy. So used these only for the motors.


Because of all the electric motors I needed more powerfull alternator. Stock is about 75A max. Got one from 350z that pumps out 150A. Temporary tensioner sollution. Will get proper one later. I have the fantasy of drysump some day so moved the alternator on the other side.

Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 02-13-2017, 03:29 AM
Logic Logic is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Finland
Posts: 41
Default

Did not like the main board. It was big, heavy and messy. Also I had add the ssd relays and arduino somewhere. All too messy.

Last september I had completed all my courses in school. Thesis work still needed to be done. I had nothing interesting from work so decided to something fun for myself. Power distribution module for car.

Couple years ago stumbled on race pack smartwire demo video on YouTube. Was really impressed about the technology but the price was too much for me.

For those who donīt know. PDM replaces traditional fuses and relays with semiconductor technology. Microprosessor monitors and controlls currents and channels. Because of the microprosessor it is possible to have smart technoly in it. Good example can be found on motecs web page.

Quote:
In Spring 2009 the Synchro Honda was competing in a BRITCAR round at Northamptonshire’s Rockingham Speedway circuit. After 60 mins of hard racing they had fought their way to second in their Production class, but as the race went on they experienced loss of engine power. The cause? Fuel had begun dissolving some of the foam present in the structure of the fuel tank. This partially dissolved foam sludge was blocking the fuel pump filter causing erratic fuel delivery and, with only three laps to go, the fuel pump finally tripped out.

The fuel line was so blocked that the PDM’s current threshold settings were exceeded, triggering it to shut down the pump to preserve the wiring and prevent a current induced fire. This temporary shut down allowed the foam bits to drop to the bottom of the tank. The PDM then automatically restarted the fuel pump, as it had been programmed to do, and they carried on racing. By this means, with over 15 shutdown and restarts over the last 3 laps, Synchro was able to limp home over the line and retain their second place podium position.

Rather than being frustrated about their fuel problems, team manager Alyn James was thrilled that their investment in MoTeC’s power management technology had paid off. “Had it not been for the intelligence built into the PDM module’s programming, and if we’d used old-fashioned fuses and relays, we would have just burnt out the fuel pump and ground to a halt, losing the entire race and valuable points.”
I planned using familiar Atmega 2560 prosessor from arduino. I got as far as logic shematic for it when I decided to switch to modern ARM-processor.

I had previously manufactured small experimental pcb in China. I did this one as well. 2-layer PCB to keep the costs down. Kicad spits out 3D models from the desing so hereīs couple renders. Rendered in Blender 3D.





PDM hand soldered. Small SMD componets. Soldering was quite interesting


Specs:
-32-bit 100Mhz ARM-CPU
-High Speed-USB
-1 CAN-Bus
-21-Channels 0-24A(Current Limited By the connectors)
-8-input switches
-Auto-Reset 0-255 times
-Time between resets 0-255 seconds
-Power consumption 0,04A

Windows software to configure the PDM. Shows current value in real-time.


Size comparison between former main board and the PDM.


Got an aluminium case for it from ebay. Will be using plastic circular connectors for it.


Still in development. Now just basic funtionality to pass this as my thesis work. I will work on the PDM and the software. Because I can get ECU information from via Can-Bus I can exploit that information and do some cool stuff.

21-Channels is not enough for me. I plan to do master-slave card configuration. They will connect with an idc cable to swap information. Slave card will be the same but I can leave some components out. That will give me total 41-43 channels.

Last edited by Logic; 03-24-2017 at 06:08 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 02-13-2017, 07:39 AM
maxtherabbit maxtherabbit is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 204
Default

damnn this is cool
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 06-04-2017, 07:34 AM
Logic Logic is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Finland
Posts: 41
Default

Graduated last week and got my engineering papers. Been on holiday for few weeks and got some progress on the PDM. Need to get it developed to certain point so I can put it in the car. Canīt do nothing else to the car untill itīs back to running condition.

Next update is bit electrical and software related instead of the usual stainless and fiberglass.

When I started developing PDM I set objectives for the project. Perhaps the most important was that PDM fuse cutoff speed has to at lest equal compared to traditional fuse. At this point I did not have any idea how fast traditional fuse reacts and is PDM microcontroller fast enough to monitor +20 fuses and handle other tasks designated to it. Remember that I first was gonna do this project with 8-Bit Arduino microcontroller.

First I looked at traditional fuses. Technology that has been unchanged since they were introduced into cars around 1930. I was quite surprised how slow to react they were. Regular 20 A MAXI fuse cutīs the power after 15 seconds with 40 A current running through it. Below is 20 A MAXI fuse melting current curve plotted. Maxifuse [Source:Fuseology. 2014. Littlefuse]


For my thesis work I measured electrical short cutoff times for both fuse and PDM. Regular 10 A automotive fuse cutoff time was 48 ms and PDM was 1 ms. This is not an issue for protection of electric wires but PDMīs fast reaction time might save the electrical equipment connected to it or for example warn from clogged or dying fuelpump.

There are three types of electric loads. Resistive, capasitive and inductive. Capasitive and inductive loads are problematic for PDM design. They both have high inrush current at beginning when turned on. Because PDM is so fast to react it will cut the power when inrush occurs. For that reason PDM had to be programmed with an start delay that takes account inrush current.

I had to do some measuring so I had some idea of the inrush current and how long it lasts. I measured 55 W automotive bulb inrush current. Bulbs have high inrush currents that are temperature dependent. Below is scope capture from the measurement. Prior measuring bulb was stored in the freezer for about 30 min. From the graph we see that the inrush current starts at 16 A reaching nominal current level 5 A after 150 ms. After the bulb was warmed the start current dropped to 9 A. Yellow is voltage and turquoise is current.


To handle the inrush current I programmed the PDM 150 ms delay where it follows inrush current curve. I used values from my bulb measurement. Starting current is three times the nominal current and it drops to the set fuse value after 150 ms. Inrush setting is configurable. It can be default=3x, or disabled or custom. In custom user can set the start current between fusevalue and 78 A. In the image below red is the inrush current and blue dots are measured inrush log-values from PDM memory.


CAN-data transmission configuration varies depending on ECUīs used. Transmission protocol is usually available from the ECU manufacturer. CAN-transmission need to be configurated so PDM can use the data. PDM has 16 memory spots to store desired values from CAN-transmission.

Singe can data is configured:
1. CAN-ID (Hex number)
2. Start byte 0-7
3. Byte length 1-2
4. Range
5. Offset for negative values


General view from channel setup. From the Channel Input section user can setup how channel is turned on. Switch 1-8 is selected and given value 1 or 0.


User can also use CAN-data to control channel active state. Channel can activate using single data with =,<,> operators or use two data-values with AND, OR, XOR logical operators.

Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 06-05-2017, 09:04 AM
induetime induetime is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Phoenix, AZ, USA
Posts: 96
Default

Awesome update! I enjoy following your progress.
__________________
First 300ZX to break 500whp on the Stock Turbo/Stock Long Block, boost only, no meth.
Currently building sub-2800# 300zx Twin BW 6258 EFR, AMB Aero, TA-U & Road Race Car.
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 06-14-2017, 08:17 PM
Razi Razi is online now
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 8
Default

You're a genius. I wish I knew how to make that kind of stuff.

Which processor did you end up using? And what components handle the 12v signals?

Last edited by Razi; 06-16-2017 at 07:27 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 06-17-2017, 12:17 PM
Logic Logic is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Finland
Posts: 41
Default

Thanks for the kind comments. They are appreciated

Quote:
Originally Posted by Razi View Post
Which processor did you end up using? And what components handle the 12v signals?
I chose Atmel SAM4E16E processor.

The 12 V signals are handled with VN7010AJ with supportive componentīs.


Last edited by Logic; 06-17-2017 at 12:25 PM..
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Style by: kreativfantasy.com
www.nissanroadracing.com