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Megan Racing Rubber Bushings

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  • #16
    As I said before, I could remove all of the bushings from the car, and modify them to make them work, but as has been mentioned, especially in the rear of the car, all off the arms move in more than one direction. My experience has shown me that this doesn't work well on a lightly sprung car. Maybe if you're running 8K+ springs, you don't notice. But if you're on a set of NISMO S-tunes, you DO notice.

    And maybe it is laziness, but re-greasing 20 bushings on a car is NOT something I want to be doing regularly. This isn't a race car.

    I got the rest of the bushings in today. If anyone is interested in pics, LMK and I'll get some, but they all look just like brand new stock bushings would look. They appear to be very high quaily. Time will tell how long the rubber actually holds up though.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by float_6969 View Post
      As I said before, I could remove all of the bushings from the car, and modify them to make them work, but as has been mentioned, especially in the rear of the car, all off the arms move in more than one direction. My experience has shown me that this doesn't work well on a lightly sprung car. Maybe if you're running 8K+ springs, you don't notice. But if you're on a set of NISMO S-tunes, you DO notice.

      And maybe it is laziness, but re-greasing 20 bushings on a car is NOT something I want to be doing regularly. This isn't a race car.

      I got the rest of the bushings in today. If anyone is interested in pics, LMK and I'll get some, but they all look just like brand new stock bushings would look. They appear to be very high quaily. Time will tell how long the rubber actually holds up though.

      Actually the only bushings on the car I mentioned are the RLCAs, Trac, FLCA, the rest are adjustable replacement arms. So greasing them doesnt take too long.

      Though it does have 9/7 springs and KW's

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      • #18
        That would make things more simple for your friend, but not for me.

        Yea, I'm running half that spring rate.

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        • #19
          I always recommend to my friends NOT to use poly bushings on their car. The only ones I found it okay to use was on the rear bushing where the traction rod bolts to the body on my friends' Evo 8. When manufacturers design most bushings, the bushing is not meant to simply rotate axially, but also experiences some other rotations that poly bushings DO NOT ALLOW. Read any suspension book that deals with OEM cars and you'll see the authors do not sanction poly bushings.
          - Phil
          1995 240sx | KA24DE-T 309whp, 368lb-ft

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          • #20
            UPDATE: The T/C bushing and FLCA bushings are installed. I didn't take any pics as my batteries were dead in the camera and my phone has been acting up (I got it wet).

            INSTALLATION:
            Install was straightforward though. Removal of the poly bushings was as easy as to be expected. Installation of the T/C bushings was a bit tough as I only have a bench top 6 ton press and it was BARELY able to fit the arm and bushing underneath it, plus the 6 ton jack barely had enough umph to get them in. But it worked and they're installed.

            As for the FLCA, I learned some important lessons that I want to pass on before anybody else attempts this. First off, WELD UP THE LCA BEFORE REMOVING THE OLD BUSHING!!! I'm sorry for the caps but this is really important. I now realize why Nissan only sells the arms and not the bushings. If you don't have a jig (which Nissan probably has/had) the arm will deform when you press out the old bushing. I saw this happening and stopped before I did too much damage. Since I had already removed the internal part of the pushing for the poly bushings, I ended up cutting the outer housing with a sawzall to remove the tension and then it tapped right out.

            Unfortunately, installation is just as hard. I didn't have a welder available, so I ended up using some scrap metal I had lying around to brace the arm so that when I pressed the new bushing it, it didn't deform the arm. If I have to do it again, I'll get a spare set of arms, weld the area around the bushing up with some scrap metal so it can't deform (it needs braced across the "opening" on the bottom of the arm to keep it from compressing/deforming) and then press the bushing out.

            After I got it all back together with the new bushings, installation was a breeze. The new bushings rubber doesn't stick out like the poly does and rub on the sub-frame, so the FLCA's went in easily. The T/C rods went in easily as well.

            Lastly, if you don't already know, because of the way rubber bushings work, DON'T TIGHTEN THEM UP UNTIL YOU'VE GOT THE WEIGHT OF THE CAR ON THE SUSPENSION!!! I was able to do this with the wheels on and the car on the ground BARELY. If you're bigger than me (I'm on the thin side), have normal length arms (I'm built like a Gorilla), or your car is any lower than mine (I've got less than a 1" drop), you will HAVE to get the car on a drive-on style lift to access the bolt/nuts to tighten them.

            IMPRESSIONS:
            Firmness is identical to the poly in that there doesn't feel like there is any unwanted play in the suspension. The car feels stable and predictable during turns and under hard braking, no squirming, swerving, pulling, etc. The noise is less (no squeeking), and the ride is better, although not by much, but the front of the car wasn't bad with the poly anyway. There is a slight difference. The first thing that I noticed was that the car felt "taught" instead of "stiff". It's a slight difference, but that little bit of extra compliance, to me, made the car more confidence inspiring. Less like to skid over a bump. So far I'm happy with the effort, although it would have been nice to know about the issues with the LCA deforming when removing/installing the bushing, but I don't think I hurt anything.

            I'm very happy with the results, and as long as they prove to be durable, I'll never buy another poly bushing.

            I'll update again when I've done the rear. That will be the big test to see if it fixes the terrible ride.
            Last edited by float_6969; 10-22-2012, 08:48 PM.

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            • #21
              This is good news for me as I've been looking for replacement bushings for the areas that don't require spherical bearings, thanks for the review!
              - Phil
              1995 240sx | KA24DE-T 309whp, 368lb-ft

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              • #22
                UPDATE!!! Ok, I have finished the drivers side rear and have a few video's.

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQSV7ur4_gM&hd=1

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1jOPee6o4M&hd=1

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6nBNDCHsPo&hd=1
                Last edited by float_6969; 11-30-2012, 09:46 PM.

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                • #23
                  So what are your impressions? I'm sure you love it a lot more than poly!
                  - Phil
                  1995 240sx | KA24DE-T 309whp, 368lb-ft

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                  • #24
                    No driving impressions yet. I only have the drivers side done. Barring any hiccups, I'll have the passenger side done tomorrow.

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                    • #25
                      Installation complete. Ride is just like it should be. Still compliant enough to absorb bumps in the road and allow the suspension to move and do it's job (keeping the tire on the ground), but not so soft to make the car wallow around. For the spring/strut combo I'm running, these are perfect. Time will tell how they hold up, but I'm pretty confident I won't be having any issues.

                      I'm REALLY happy with this modification. I will probably never run another poly bushing in an S-chassis car again. Especially after reading about how the suspension was designed to work, a rubber bushing is the only bushing that will allow the suspension to work as it was intended.

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                      • #26
                        Great thread and videos, just wish I done research before fitting poly's

                        You echo my feelings about poly's though, I'm about to remove ES poly's for Hardrace Rubber.

                        I have a question though for the rear lower arm bushes, if looking at it from the perspective the rear lower arms are attached to the car, does the lip on the metal bush go towards the front of the car or towards the rear?

                        I'v checked the service manual and there is no mention or detailed pics.

                        Last edited by immy21; 01-25-2013, 08:41 AM.

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                        • #27
                          I'l answer my own question, the lip goes towards the front of the car.
                          Pics from FRsports, flat side of arm is rear side.

                          http://www.frsport.com/Nissan-Genuin...X_p_14377.html

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                          • #28
                            LOL, I asked myself the same question and used the same picture to answer it. Fair warning, the RLCA's were the WORST part of this job. I had to custom make some parts to be able to press them in without bending the arm.

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                            • #29
                              How do you think these compare against the bushings in a brand new set of OEM LCAs? It'd be about $200 plus the work time to replace ball joints and bushings in my current ones, I'd almost rather spend $300 on an OEM set, box them and install in an hour.

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                              • #30
                                If it's a Nissan arm, these bushings seem to be a bit more stiff (although that is compared to the bushings I took out that had 100K miles on them). If it's a NISMO arm, they're probably comparable.

                                If you don't have a press and a welder available, a new arm may be a better option for you.

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